Time To, Uh, Relax

Taking a bath with kids in the house is kind of like taking shots of cheap vodka — you aren’t going to enjoy it. You might think you will for some ungodly reason, but reality will come crashing down pretty quickly.

That moment of tranquility as you’re becoming one with water that’s almost scalding hot will quickly dissipate as the stream of constant interruptions begins. And, sure, you could lock the door, but that doesn’t stop them from yelling from the other side (nor does it stop the toddler from trying to break the door down). And, you better be ready to pay back those minutes you carved away from yourself with interest, because believe me, the kids are counting.

By the way, if you ever want a younger child to take a bath, the best way to do so is to get in yourself and load up on the bubbles. As much as my daughter has fun taking baths (in her “swimming pool” as she calls the tub), she fights tooth and nail over actually having to get in. All I have to do is announce that I’m taking a bubble bath and get in, and within a few minutes her head appears over the side of the tub. She marvels over the bubbles and then calls her dad to undress her so she can get in.

For getting older kids to bathe — good luck. I’ve yet to find a way to get Little Man to take a shower without him complaining because he doesn’t want to lose out on free time before bed. I’ve pointed out to no avail that his process of complaining and dragging his feet probably takes more time than actually bathing. Maybe one of these days he’ll get it.

Want to connect on social media? You can find links to my accounts at the top of the menu bar on my page, or go here for Facebook and look up Instagram and Twitter with @dorkymomdoodles.

#ThingsToddlersSay: Feel Better

Kids can be hilarious at times — sometimes it’s intentional, and sometimes it’s not. And sometimes they can do things so sweet that you wonder how you managed to put something so kindhearted into the world. (And, to be fair, you also sometimes wonder how you managed to put little heathens in the world.)

Last Sunday, I wasn’t feeling great — I wasn’t sick, but had some cramping stuff going on and needed to lie down and use the heating pad. Unfortunately, Baby Girl is not a fan of me lying down, ever.

“Mommy, you not go to sleep! You get up and play with me!” the two-year-old tyrant demanded.

When I explained to her that I wasn’t feeling well and needed to lie down and suggested we read, she informed me in no uncertain terms that I wasn’t sick. “Mommy, you not sick. You don’t need the medicine. Please, get up! We go play Peppa and Batman and cook…”

She wasn’t short for ideas of things to do that didn’t include me lying on the heating pad. I thought I had convinced her to go play with her brother or her dad for a bit when she disappeared. A few minutes later, though, she was back carrying a little Halloween bucket that she had gotten from McDonald’s. The doodle below shows the sweet moment that followed.

Gah. My heart immediately melted. I asked my husband if he had suggested doing something to make me feel better, but this one was all on her own. It didn’t matter a bit that it was someone’s leftover bottle of water from the table and stale pretzels and popcorns leftover from a snack — I ate and drank every bit of it. And, yes, I eventually moved to the floor to play (thankfully that heating pad has a heck of a long cord).

What’s something your child has done that made your heart melt?

Want to connect on social media? You can find links to my accounts at the top of the menu bar on my page, or go here for Facebook and look up Instagram and Twitter with @dorkymomdoodles.

Speaking Toddler-ese

On the home from school yesterday, Little Man and I had a conversation about his sister. Little Man was 6 when Baby Girl was born (they’re 9 and 2 now). We talked about her upcoming birthday (which is in June, but I’m already planning), when he commented that he missed the cute things she used to say when she first started talking.

“Do you remember how she used to say, ‘Hey, bo,’ to everyone?” Little Man asked.

I did. We were resigned to the idea, for a time, that it’d be in her destiny to rock pink camo.

“And how about all the crazy words she’d use?” LM asked. “Remember ‘Go-Go’?”

I chuckled. Ah, “Go-Go.” That one took a while to figure out, but eventually we realized she wanted to watch Frozen; specifically, the scene where Elsa sings Let It Go. She later upped the ante by calling every song in the movie “Go-Go,” and you’d have to figure out which song she wanted based on the inflection. I can’t remember it all, but it was something like “Go-Go” meant For The First Time In Forever and “Go-Go-Go” meant Olaf’s song.

I relayed my and Little Man’s discussion to my husband last night, which prompted us to talk about LM’s toddler vocabulary versus Baby Girl’s. LM started talking early — and talked very clearly, I might add —  so rarely were we confused when he’d ask for something. Have a look at some of Little Man’s words:

For the record, we didn’t feed Little Man only cereal when he was young. But, it’s been around 7 to 8 years since he was a toddler, and I’m struggling to think of anything else he called food that was either confusing or funny.

And now for Baby Girl. As you’ve probably gathered from the Go-Go info, the words she used for when she couldn’t say the right word weren’t always as easy to figure out as with Little Man. The easiest we got was her asking for balls, which meant she wanted an orange, an apple, blueberries, or grapes. So, even with that, there was still a bit of trial and error before we gave her the right thing.

Check out some of her more difficult words:

By the way — she still occasionally asks for bites. She does this when she wants something to eat, but doesn’t know what she wants and wants me to offer her a dozen things so she can decide. She’ll also ask for “a that” and expects me to do the same thing.

So, parents/caregivers/people who were once kids — do you have any cute/confusing words to share?

IRS v. PTO

Would you rather deal with the IRS or with the PTO?

Hmm?

You probably had to take a second to think about that. Answering questions related to purchases made years ago, deductions made, and other boring nonsense sounds pretty bad. But then you realize that the PTO acts both as a mafia of sorts and treats you like you’re a lower tier drug dealer, and you might start to realize that the IRS isn’t the worst thing in the world.

“Get out there with these packs of way overpriced M&Ms and don’t come back until they’re gone.”

“Little Peter can only sell 10 tins of popcorn? Get his butt back out in front of the Walmart ’til they’re gone.”

“Each child was supposed to raise $300 for this fundraiser. Your child raised $298.12. You think that’s acceptable? Hit. The. Streets. Find that money or else!”

Or something like that.

 

Any good, over-the-top PTO stories to share? 

#WeekendCoffeeShare: Things Are Slowing Down

If we were having coffee, I’d first tell you that I’m excited about starting this new blog. I have another blog on WordPress, but this one is a big change, plus it’s always fun starting something new. I’ve never been artistically inclined, but I’ve been enjoying creating the doodles and learning how to use the Adobe Draw app on my iPad. Learning something new tech-related is half the fun, at least at first.

Now, on to other things…

Over our drinks I’d tell you that this has been a relatively easy week. No one has been sick (hooray March), and aside from the kids going to school, the only thing we’ve had going on this week is soccer and a couple of appointments. That’s a relatively laid back week, especially when I’m not having to wash 10 loads of pukey clothes!


Next Saturday is Little Man’s soccer jamboree. My husband is coaching this year, and I’m helping out when I can. I stayed home with Baby Girl this morning since it’s cold out for a change. (We’ve had a very warm winter, but had a freeze last night, so it’s chilly. The temps will be back in the high 60s in a couple of days, though.) My husband is doing a great job with them, so hopefully they’ll have a good season.

Outside of soccer practice, I think that’s all that is on the agenda for this coming week. It’s a relief to look at the calendar and see days with no extra appointments, project due dates, etc. It feels like we’ve been running a marathon since September, outside of a couple weeks break before Christmas. Now if we can just keep everyone healthy as well, maybe we can catch our breath!


Between a largely uneventful week and a hopefully uneventful week to come, that’s all I’ve got for today. ‘Til next time!

How was your week?

Weekend Coffee Share is hosted by Nerd In The Brain.

Angels vs. Demons

When I went for a conference with Little Man’s teacher a while back, I noticed that a list of chores on the wall. There were different tasks, like emptying the waste bin, stacking chairs, collecting papers, etc. And each task had a picture of a student velcroed next to it.

“So, Little Man, you do one of the chores on this list every day?” I asked him.

“Yep! Our teacher lets us do chores every day. ” (Yes, he said that she “lets” them do chores.)

Since he sounded enthusiastic (and he never sounds enthusiastic about work), I figured there must have been some type of reward involved, so I asked if they were getting paid anything — maybe classroom currency that could be redeemed for pencils or something.

“No. This is our classroom and we all have a job to do.”

That sounds mature and responsible, right? Well, I’ve said the same thing about our home, how the family has to work together to keep it nice, but he wasn’t quite as enthusiastic over taking care of our shared space. Go figure.

It’s funny that their attitudes can vary so much depending on where the chore was assigned. Chores at school? Special privileges. Chores at home? Modern day torture technique to be avoided at all costs.

Netflix And (Legit) Chill

A night without the kids is an amazing thing. You can do all sorts of things that you can’t when they’re with you — eat at nice restaurants, go shopping whine-free, eat snack cakes without little vultures appearing when they hear the crinkling of the cellophane.

On to plans for the night — there are many decisions to be made. Where do we go? What do we eat? Do we stay home and do the parenting version of Netflix and chill (you know — the one where all you do is watch Netflix and actually chill)? Hmm.

img_0012

What do you like to do when you get a night to yourself?